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Lady Bird leads 2017 awards

BEST ACTRESS:

*1. Sally Hawkins – 49 (The Shape of Water, Maudie)

  1. Saoirse Ronan – 44 (Lady Bird)
  2. Frances McDormand 24 (Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri)
  3. Cynthia Nixon – 24 (A Quiet Passion) [tie]

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS:

*1. Laurie Metcalf – 74 (Lady Bird)

  1. Lesley Manville – 36 (Phantom Thread)
  2. Allison Janney – 24 (I, Tonya)

BEST ACTOR:

*1. Daniel Kaluuya – 44 (Get Out)

  1. Daniel Day-Lewis – 34 (Phantom Thread)
  2. Timothée Chalamet — 24 (Call Me by Your Name)

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR:

*1. Willem Dafoe – 62 (The Florida Project)

  1. Michael Stuhlbarg – 25 (Call Me by Your Name, The Shape of Water, The Post)
  2. Sam Rockwell – 23 (Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri)

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY:

*1. Blade Runner 2049 – 40 (Roger Deakins)

  1. Dunkirk – 39 (Hoyte van Hoytema)
  2. The Florida Project – 36 (Alexis Zabe)

BEST SCREENPLAY:

*1. Lady Bird – 50 (Greta Gerwig)

  1. Get Out – 49 (Jordan Peele)
  2. Phantom Thread – 31 (Paul Thomas Anderson)

BEST PICTURE:

*1. Lady Bird – 41

  1. Get Out – 39
  2. Phantom Thread – 28

BEST DIRECTOR:

*1. Greta Gerwig – 37 (Lady Bird)

  1. Jordan Peele – 36 (Get Out)
  2. Paul Thomas Anderson – 36 (Phantom Thread)  [tie]

BEST FOREIGN-LANGUAGE FILM

*1. Graduation – 35 (Cristian Mungiu)

  1. Faces Places – 30 (Agnès Varda)
  2. BPM (Beats Per Minute) – 29 (Robin Campillo)

BEST NON-FICTION FILM

*1. Faces Places – 70 (Agnès Varda)

  1. Ex Libris: The New York Public Library – 34 (Frederick Wiseman)
  2. Dawson City: Frozen Time – 32 (Bill Morrison)

BEST EXPERIMENTAL FILM:  Good Luck, by Ben Russell

FILM HERITAGE AWARD:

  • “One Way or Another: Black Women’s Cinema, 1970-1991,” curated by the Brooklyn Academy of Music Cinématek.  Co-programmers Nellie Killian, BAMcinematek and Michelle Materre, Creatively Speaking.
  • Special commendation to Dan Talbot for his pioneering work as an exhibitor and distributor, in bringing world-wide cinema to the United States.

SPECIAL CITATION for a film awaiting U.S. distribution: Spoor (Pokot), by Agnieska Holland.

This year’s National Society of Film Critics awards are dedicated to Richard Schickel, the legendary film critic and historian, author of 37 books and director of 37 documentaries, and a founding member of the Society.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Response to Disney blackout of L.A. Times

A STATEMENT FROM THE LOS ANGELES FILM CRITICS ASSOCIATION, THE NEW YORK FILM CRITICS CIRCLE, THE BOSTON SOCIETY OF FILM CRITICS AND THE NATIONAL SOCIETY OF FILM CRITICS

Nov. 7, 2017 — The members of the Los Angeles Film Critics Association, the New York Film Critics Circle, the Boston Society of Film Critics and the National Society of Film Critics jointly denounce the Walt Disney Company’s media blackout of the Los Angeles Times. Furthermore, all four critics’ organizations have voted to disqualify Disney’s films from year-end awards consideration until said blackout is publicly rescinded.

On Nov. 3, The Times published a statement that its writers and editors had been blocked from attending advance screenings of Disney films, in response to The Times’ news coverage of Disney’s business arrangements with the City of Anaheim. Disney’s actions, which include an indefinite ban on any interaction with The Times, are antithetical to the principles of a free press and set a dangerous precedent in a time of already heightened hostility toward journalists.

It is admittedly extraordinary for a critics’ group, let alone four critics’ groups, to take any action that might penalize film artists for decisions beyond their control. But Disney brought forth this action when it chose to punish The Times’ journalists rather than express its disagreement with a business story via ongoing public discussion. Disney’s response should gravely concern all who believe in the importance of a free press, artists included.

The New York Film Critics Circle will vote on its annual awards Thursday, Nov. 30; the Los Angeles Film Critics Association will vote Sunday, Dec. 3; the Boston Society of Film Critics will vote Sunday, Dec. 10; and the National Society of Film Critics will vote Saturday, Jan. 6.

Claudia Puig
President, Los Angeles Film Critics Association claudiapuig2@gmail.com

Eric Kohn
Chair, New York Film Critics Circle eric@indiewire.com

Tom Meek
President, Boston Society of Film Critics thom3@aol.com

Liz Weis
Executive Director, National Society of Film Critics NSFCmail@gmail.com

Awards for 2016

SPECIAL CITATION for a film awaiting U.S. distribution: Sieranevada (Romania) Cristi Puiu

FILM HERITAGE AWARD: Kino Lorber’s 5-disc collection “Pioneers of African-American Cinema”

BEST ACTOR

*1. Casey Affleck (65) – Manchester by the Sea

  1. Denzel Washington (21) – Fences
  2. Adam Driver (20) – Paterson

BEST ACTRESS

*1. Isabelle Huppert (55) – Elle and Things to Come

  1. Annette Bening (26) – 20th Century Women
  2. Sandra Hüller (26) – Toni Erdmann [tied with Bening]

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR

*1. Mahershala Ali (72) – Moonlight

  1. Jeff Bridges (18) – Hell or High Water
  2. Michael Shannon (14) – Nocturnal Animals

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS

*1. Michelle Williams (58) – Manchester by the Sea

  1. Lily Gladstone (45) – Certain Women
  2. Naomie Harris (25) – Moonlight

BEST SCREENPLAY

*1. Manchester by the Sea (61) – Kenneth Lonergan

  1. Moonlight (39) – Barry Jenkins
  2. Hell or High Water (16) – Taylor Sheridan

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY

*1. Moonlight (52) – James Laxton

  1. La La Land (27) – Linus Sandgren
  2. Silence (23) – Rodrigo Prieto

BEST PICTURE

*1. Moonlight (54)

  1. Manchester by the Sea (39)
  2. La La Land (31)

BEST DIRECTOR

*1. Barry Jenkins (53) – Moonlight

  1. Damien Chazelle (37) – La La Land
  2. Kenneth Lonergan (23) – Manchester by the Sea

FOREIGN-LANGUAGE FILM

*1. Toni Erdmann (52)

  1. The Handmaiden (26)
  2. Elle (19) and

3. Things to Come (19) tied

BEST NON-FICTION FILM

*1. O.J.: Made in America (64)

  1. I Am Not Your Negro (36)
  2. 13th (20)

GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATIONS

The National Society of Film Critics has been advancing the cause of great filmmaking and criticism for half a century.

To celebrate, member critics have teamed up with curators from Boston to L.A. to choose from among the group’s fifty Best Pictures in order to present screenings with talks.

Presentations have included Blue Velvet, Stranger Than Paradise, There Will Be Blood, and Life is Sweet. The complete list of Best Pictures is provided below.

Here is a list of the events and venues:

March – Film Forum, New York City

May and June – the Music Box Theatre, Chicago

November/December – American Cinemateque, Los Angeles.

January 2017 – Brattle Theatre, Boston

BEST PICTURES:

  1. 1966 BLOW-UP
  2. 1967 PERSONA
  3. 1968 SHAME
  4. 1969 Z
  5. 1970 M*A*S*H
  6. 1971 CLAIRE’S KNEE
  7. 1972 THE DISCREET CHARM OF THE BOURGEOISIE
  8. 1973 DAY FOR NIGHT
  9. 1974 SCENES FROM A MARRIAGE
  10. 1975 NASHVILLE
  11. 1976 ALL THE PRESIDENT’S MEN
  12. 1977 ANNIE HALL
  13. 1978 GET OUT YOUR HANDKERCHIEFS
  14. 1979 BREAKING AWAY
  15. 1980 MELVIN AND HOWARD
  16. 1981 ATLANTIC CITY
  17. 1982 TOOTSIE
  18. 1983 NIGHT OF THE SHOOTING STARS
  19. 1984 STRANGER THAN PARADISE
  20. 1985 RAN
  21. 1986 BLUE VELVET
  22. 1987 THE DEAD
  23. 1988 THE UNBEARABLE LIGHTNESS OF BEING
  24. 1989 DRUGSTORE COWBOY
  25. 1990 GOODFELLAS
  26. 1991     LIFE IS SWEET
  27. 1992 UNFORGIVEN
  28. 1993 SCHINDLER’S LIST
  29. 1994 PULP FICTION
  30. 1995     BABE
  31. 1996 BREAKING THE WAVES
  32.  1997    L.A. CONFIDENTIAL
  1. 1998 OUT OF SIGHT
  2. 1999 TOPSY-TURVY and BEING JOHN MALKOVICH
  3. 2000 YI YI
  4. 2001 MULHOLLAND DRIVE
  5. 2002 THE PIANIST
  6. 2003 AMERICAN SPLENDOR
  7. 2004 MILLION DOLLAR BABY
  8. 2005 CAPOTE
  9. 2006 PAN’S LABYRINTH
  10. 2007 THERE WILL BE BLOOD
  11. 2008     WALTZ WITH BASHIR
  12. 2009 THE HURT LOCKER
  13. 2010 THE SOCIAL NETWORK
  14. 2011     MELANCHOLIA
  15. 2012     AMOUR
  16. 2013     INSIDE LLEWYN DAVIS
  17. 2014 GOODBYE TO LANGUAGE
  18.  2015    SPOTLIGHT
  19.  2016  MOONLIGHT

Awards for 2015 films

BEST ACTOR:

*1. Michael B. Jordan (Creed) 29 points

  1. Geza Rohrig (Son of Saul) 18
  2. Tom Courtenay (45 Years) 15

 

BEST ACTRESS:

*1. Charlotte Rampling (45 Years) 57

  1. Saoirse Ronan (Brooklyn) 30
  2. Nina Hoss (Phoenix) 22

 

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR:

*1. Mark Rylance (Bridge of Spies) 56

  1. Michael Shannon (99 Homes) 16
  2. Sylvester Stallone (Creed) 14

 

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS:

*1. Kristen Stewart (Clouds of Sils Maria) 53

  1. Alicia Vikander (Ex Machina) 23
  2. Kate Winslet (Steve Jobs) 17 and Elizabeth Banks (Love & Mercy) 17

 

BEST SCREENPLAY:

*1. Spotlight (Josh Singer and Tom McCarthy) 21

  1. Anomalisa (Charlie Kaufman) 15  and The Big Short (Charles Randolph and Adam McKay) 15

 

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY:

*1. Carol (Ed Lachman) 25

  1. The Assassin (Mark Lee Ping-bin) 22
  2. Mad Max: Fury Road (John Seale) 12

 

BEST PICTURE:

*1. Spotlight (Tom McCarthy) 23

  1. Carol (Todd Haynes) 17
  2. Mad Max: Fury Road (George Miller) 13

 

BEST DIRECTOR:

*1.Todd Haynes (Carol) 21

  1. Tom McCarthy (Spotlight) 21 (because he was on fewer ballots; a winner must be on a majority of ballots, which are weighted)
  2. George Miller (Mad Max: Fury Road) 20

 

BEST FOREIGN-LANGUAGE FILM:

*1. Timbuktu (Abderrahmane Sissako) 22

  1. Phoenix (Christian Petzold) 20
  2. The Assassin (Hou Hsiao-hsien) 16

 

BEST NON-FICTION FILM:

*1. Amy (Asif Kapadia) 23

  1. In Jackson Heights (Frederick Wiseman) 18
  2. Seymour: An Introduction (Ethan Hawke) 15

 

FILM HERITAGE AWARDS:

Film Society of Lincoln Center and the programmers Jake Perlin and Michelle Materre, for the series Tell It Like It Is: Black Independents in New York, 1968-1986

The Criterion Collection and L’Immagine Ritrovata for the restoration and packaging of the reconstructed version of The Apu Trilogy by Satyajit Ray

Lobster Films and Fondazione Cineteca di Bologna/L’Immagine Ritrovata for the restoration of Charlie Chaplin’s Essanay Films

SPECIAL CITATION for a film awaiting American distribution:   One Floor Below, a Romanian film directed by Radu Muntean.

 

This meeting was dedicated to the late Richard Corliss, longtime critic at TIME magazine, not just a writer of extraordinary intelligence, wit, and energy, but also a generous friend and colleague.

Jean-Luc Godard thanks NSFC for Best Film citation

Jean-Luc Godard thanks NSFC for Best Film citation.

Godard says the last line reads “aun aprendo” –still learning. It is thought that the drawing is by Goya.

2014 Awards: “Goodbye to Language,” Timothy Spall, Marion Cotillard

 

The National Society of Film Critics on Saturday, January 3, 2015, chose Jean-Luc Godard’s 3-D film Goodbye to Language as Best Picture of the Year 2014.

The Society, made up of many of the country’s most distinguished movie critics, held its 49th annual awards voting meeting, using a weighted ballot system, at the Elinor Bunin Munroe Center as guests of the Film Society of Lincoln Center. Scrolls will be sent to the winners.

Fifty-nine members are eligible to vote, though a few disqualify themselves if they haven’t seen every film. Any film that opened in the U.S. during the year 2014 was eligible for consideration. There is no nomination process; members meet, vote (using a weighted ballot), and announce all on January 3rd. There is no awards party; scrolls are sent to the winners.

Here is a list of the winners and runners-up, with vote counts from the final round.

BEST PICTURE
*1. Goodbye to Language 25 (Jean-Luc Godard)
2. Boyhood 24 (Richard Linklater)
3. Birdman 10 (Alejandro G. Iñárritu)
3. Mr. Turner 10 (Mike Leigh)

BEST DIRECTOR
*1. Richard Linklater 36 (Boyhood)
2. Jean-Luc Godard 17 (Goodbye to Language)
3. Mike Leigh 12 (Mr. Turner)

BEST NON-FICTION FILM
*1. Citizenfour 56 (Laura Poitras)
2. National Gallery 19 (Frederick Wiseman)
3. The Overnighters 17 (Jesse Moss)

BEST SCREENPLAY
*1. The Grand Budapest Hotel 24 (Wes Anderson)
2. Inherent Vice 15 (Paul Thomas Anderson)
2. Birdman 15 (four co-writers)

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY
*1. Mr. Turner 33 (Dick Pope)
2. The Immigrant 27 (Darius Khondji)
3. Goodbye to Language 9 (Fabrice Aragno)

BEST ACTOR
*1.Timothy Spall 31 (Mr. Turner)
2. Tom Hardy 10 (Locke)
3. Joaquin Phoenix 9 (Inherent Vice)
3. Ralph Fiennes 9 (The Grand Budapest Hotel)

BEST ACTRESS
*1. Marion Cotillard 80 (The Immigrant; Two Days, One Night)
2. Julianne Moore 35 (Still Alice)
3. Scarlett Johansson 21 (Lucy; Under the Skin)

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
*1. J.K. Simmons 24 (Whiplash)
2. Mark Ruffalo 21 (Foxcatcher)
3. Edward Norton 16 (Birdman)

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
*1. Patricia Arquette 26 (Boyhood)
2. Agata Kulesza 18 (Ida)
3. Rene Russo 9 (Nightcrawler)

FILM HERITAGE AWARD
1. To Ron Magliozzi, associate curator, and Peter Williamson, film conservation manager, of the Museum of Modern Art, for identifying and assembling the earliest surviving footage of what would have been the first feature film to star a black cast, the 1913 “Lime Kiln Field Day” starring Bert Williams.

2. To Ron Hutchinson, co-founder and director of The Vitaphone Project, which since 1991 has collected and restored countless original soundtrack discs for early sound short films and features, including the recent Warner Bros. restoration of William A. Seiter’s 1929 “Why Be Good?”

DEDICATION: The meeting was dedicated to the memory of two distinguished members of the Society who died in 2014: Jay Carr and Charles Champlin.

2013 Awards: “Inside Llewyn Davis,” Oscar Isaac, Cate Blanchett

The National Society of Film Critics on Saturday, January 4th, 2014, chose Inside Llewyn Davis as Best Picture of the Year 2013. See the following pages for all votes in Best Picture and other categories for outstanding film achievement.

The Society, made up of many of the country’s most distinguished movie critics, held its 48th annual awards voting meeting, using a weighted ballot system, at the Elinor Bunin Munroe Center as guests of the Film Society of Lincoln Center. Scrolls will be sent to the winners.

Fifty-six members are eligible to vote, though a few disqualify themselves if they haven’t seen every film. Any film that opened in the U.S. during the year 2013 was eligible for consideration. There is no nomination process; members meet, vote (using a weighted ballot), and announce all on January 4th. There is no awards party; scrolls are sent to the winners.

Here is a list of the winners and runners-up, with vote counts from the final round.

BEST PICTURE
*1. Inside Llewyn Davis – 23
2. American Hustle – 17
3. 12 Years a Slave – 16
3. her – 16

BEST DIRECTOR
*1. Joel and Ethan Coen (Inside Llewyn Davis) – 25
2. Alfonso Cuarón (Gravity) – 18
3. Steve McQueen (12 Years a Slave) – 15

BEST FOREIGN-LANGUAGE FILM
*1. Blue Is the Warmest Color – 27
2. A Touch of Sin – 21
3. The Great Beauty – 15

BEST NON-FICTION FILM
*1. The Act of Killing (Joshua Oppenheimer) – 20
*1. At Berkeley (Frederick Wiseman) – 20
3. Leviathan (Lucien Castaing-Taylor and Véréna Paravel) – 18

BEST SCREENPLAY
*1. Before Midnight (Richard Linklater, Julie Delpy, Ethan Hawke) – 29
2. Inside Llewyn Davis (Joel and Ethan Coen) – 26
3. American Hustle (Eric Singer and David O. Russell) – 18

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY
*1. Inside Llewyn Davis (Bruno Delbonnel) -28
2.Gravity (Emmanuel Lubezki) – 26
3. Nebraska (Phedon Papamichael) – 19

BEST ACTOR
*1. Oscar Isaac (Inside Llewyn Davis) – 28
2. Chiwetel Ejiofor (12 Years a Slave) – 19
3. Robert Redford (All Is Lost) – 12

BEST ACTRESS
*1. Cate Blanchett (Blue Jasmine) – 57
2. Adèle Exarchopoulos (Blue Is the Warmest Color) – 36
3. Julie Delpy (Before Midnight) – 26

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
*1. James Franco (Spring Breakers) – 24
2. Jared Leto (Dallas Buyers Club) – 20
3. Barkhad Abdi (Captain Phillips) – 14

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
*1. Jennifer Lawrence (American Hustle) – 54
2. Lupita Nyong’o (12 Years a Slave) – 38
3. Sally Hawkins (Blue Jasmine) – 18
3. Léa Seydoux (Blue Is the Warmest Color) – 18

EXPERIMENTAL FILM
• Leviathan (Lucien Castaing-Taylor and Véréna Paravel)

FILM HERITAGE AWARD
• To the Museum of Modern Art, for its wide-ranging retrospective of the films of Allan Dwan.
• “Too Much Johnson”: the surviving reels from Orson Welles’s first professional film. Discovered by Cinemazero (Pordenone) and Cineteca del Friuli; funded by the National Film Preservation Foundation; and restored by the George Eastman House.
• British Film Institute for restorations of Alfred Hitchcock’s nine silent features.
• To the DVD “American Treasures from the New Zealand Film Archive.”

BEST FILM STILL AWAITING AMERICAN DISTRIBUTION
• Stray Dogs (Tsai Ming-liang)
• Hide Your Smiling Faces (Daniel Patrick Carbone)

DEDICATION: The meeting was dedicated to the memory of two distinguished members of the Society who died in 2013: Roger Ebert and Stanley Kauffmann.

2012 Awards: “Amour,” Emmanuelle Riva, Daniel Day-Lewis

Jan 5, 2013 — The National Society of Film Critics, made of 60 of the country’s most prominent writers on film, today voted Michael Haneke’s “Amour” the best film of 2012. A full list of the other awards follows, with the winner designated by an asterisk and the first and second runners up listed with the number of votes each received.

BEST ACTOR
*1. Daniel Day-Lewis (Lincoln) – 59
2. Denis Lavant – 49
2. Joaquin Phoenix – 49

BEST ACTRESS
*1. Emmanuelle Riva (Amour) – 50
2. Jennifer Lawrence – 42
3. Jessica Chastain– 32

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
*1. Matthew McConaughey (Magic Mike, Bernie) – 27
2. Tommy Lee Jones – 22
3. Philip Seymour Hoffman – 19

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
*1. Amy Adams (The Master) – 34
2. Sally Field – 23
3. Anne Hathaway – 13

BEST PICTURE
*1. Amour – 28
2. The Master – 25
3. Zero Dark Thirty – 18

BEST DIRECTOR
*1. Michael Haneke (Amour) – 27
2. Kathryn Bigelow – 24
2. Paul Thomas Anderson – 24

BEST NONFICTION
*1. The Gatekeepers – 53
2. This Is Not a Film – 45
3. Searching for Sugar Man – 23

BEST SCREENPLAY
*1. Lincoln (Tony Kushner) – 59
2. The Master (P.T. Anderson)– 27
3. Silver Linings Playbook (David O. Russell) – 19

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY
*1. The Master (Mihai Malaimare, Jr.) – 60
2. Skyfall– 30
3. Zero Dark Thirty – 21

EXPERIMENTAL: This Is Not a Film (Jafar Panahi)

FILM HERITAGE
• To Laurence Kardish, Senior Film Curator at MoMA, for his extraordinary 44 years of service, including this year’s Weimar Cinema retrospective.
• To Milestone Film & Video for their ongoing Shirley Clarke project.

DEDICATION: This year’s awards are dedicated to the late Andrew Sarris, one of the most original and influential American film critics as well as a founding member of the Society

2011 Awards: “Melancholia,” Pitt, Dunst, Brooks, Chastain, Malick

The National Society of Film Critics on Saturday, January 7th, 2012, chose “Melancholia”
as Best Picture of the Year 2011. Kristin Dunst was named best actress for her performance in Lars von Trier’s film, and Brad Pitt was named best actor for his work in “Moneyball” and “The Tree of Life.” Albert Brooks (or his evil twin) won best supporting actor for his appearance in “Drive,” and Jessica Chastain was named best supporting actress for her work in three films: “The Tree of Life,” “Take Shelter” and “The Help.”

See below for all votes in Best Picture and other categories for outstanding film achievement.

The Society, which is made up of 58 of the country’s most prominent movie critics, held its 46th annual awards voting meeting at Sardi’s Restaurant in New York City, using a weighted ballot system. Scrolls will be sent to the winners.

The meeting was dedicated to the memory of our colleague Robert Sklar.

BEST ACTOR
*1. Brad Pitt – 35 (Moneyball, The Tree of Life)
2. Gary Oldman – 22 (Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy)
3. Jean Dujardin – 19 (The Artist)

BEST ACTRESS
*1. Kirsten Dunst – 39 (Melancholia)
2. Yun Jung-hee – 25 (Poetry)
3. Meryl Streep – 20 (The Iron Lady)

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
*1. Albert Brooks – 38 (Drive)
2. Christopher Plummer – 24 (Beginners)
3. Patton Oswalt – 19 (Young Adult)

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
*1. Jessica Chastain – 30 (The Tree of Life, Take Shelter, The Help)
2. Jeannie Berlin – 19 (Margaret)
3. Shailene Woodley – 17 (The Descendants)

BEST PICTURE
*1. Melancholia – 29 (Lars von Trier)
2. The Tree of Life – 28 (Terrence Malick)
3. A Separation – 20 (Asghar Farhadi)

BEST DIRECTOR
*1. Terrence Malick – 31 (The Tree of Life)
2. Martin Scorsese – 29 (Hugo)
3. Lars von Trier – 23 (Melancholia)

BEST NONFICTION
*1. Cave of Forgotten Dreams – 35 (Werner Herzog)
2. The Interrupters – 26 (Steve James)
3. Into the Abyss – 18 (Werner Herzog)

BEST SCREENPLAY
*1. A Separation – 39 (Asghar Farhadi)
2. Moneyball – 22 (Steven Zaillian, Aaron Sorkin)
3. Midnight in Paris – 16 (Woody Allen)

BEST FOREIGN-LANGUAGE FILM
*1. A Separation – 67 (Asghar Farhadi)
2. Mysteries of Lisbon – 28 (Raoul Ruiz)
3. Le Havre – 22 (Aki Kaurismäki)

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY
*1. The Tree of Life – 76 (Emmanuel Lubezki)
2. Melancholia – 41 (Manuel Alberto Claro)
3. Hugo – 33 (Robert Richardson)

EXPERIMENTAL
Ken Jacobs, for “Seeking the Monkey King.”

FILM HERITAGE
1. BAMcinématek for its complete Vincente Minnelli retrospective with all titles shown on 16 mm. or 35 mm. film.
2. Lobster Films, Groupama Gan Foundation for Cinema and the Technicolor Foundation for Cinema for the restoration of the color version of George Méliès’s “A Trip to the Moon.”
3. New York’s Museum of Modern Art for its extensive retrospective of Weimar Cinema.
4. Flicker Alley for their box set “Landmarks of Early Soviet Film.”
5. Criterion Collecton for its 2-disc DVD package “The Complete Jean Vigo.”